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Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography: Selectio...
55,99 € *
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Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography: Selections from the Pinhole Resource Collection: Pinhole Photography: Selections from the Pinhole Resource Coll ab 55.99 € als gebundene Ausgabe: . Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Kunst & Musik,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 02.06.2020
Zum Angebot
Computer Vision: A Modern Approach
50,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Appropriate for upper-division undergraduate- and graduate-level courses in computer vision found in departments of Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering. This textbook provides the most complete treatment of modern computer vision methods by two of the leading authorities in the field. This accessible presentation gives both a general view of the entire computer vision enterprise and also offers sufficient detail for students to be able to build useful applications. Students will learn techniques that have proven to be useful by first-hand experience and a wide range of mathematical methods. Features + Benefits Broad coverage—Coverage of a wide range of topics allows customization to fit instructor, student, and course needs. Allows instructors to select the most relevant topics for their students and encourages students to enrich their coursework by reading information on other computer vision topics. Most comprehensive and up-to-date text on computer vision—Includes essential topics that either reflect practical significance or are of theoretical importance. Provides students with the most coherent synthesis of current views and teaches them successful techniques for building applications. Depth of the material accessible to various levels of students—Topics are discussed in substantial and increasing depth. While the first half of each chapter is accessible to undergraduates, a good grasp of each chapter provides students with a professional level of skill and knowledge. Application surveys—Describe numerous important application areas such as image based rendering and digital libraries. Teaches students about practical use of techniques and helps them gain insight into the demands of applications. Many important algorithms broken down and illustrated in pseudo code. Enables students to build working systems easily as they can understand the construction of the final application. Excellent pedagogy throughout the text—Includes numerous worked examples, exercises, programming assignments, and extensive illustrations. Provides students with ample opportunity to apply the concepts in the text. I IMAGE FORMATION 1 1 Geometric Camera Models 3 1.1 Image Formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.1 Pinhole Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.2 Weak Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.1.3 Cameras with Lenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.1.4 The Human Eye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.2 Intrinsic and Extrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.2.1 Rigid Transformations and Homogeneous Coordinates . . . . 14 1.2.2 Intrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.2.3 Extrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 1.2.4 Perspective Projection Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1.2.5 Weak-Perspective Projection Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 1.3 Geometric Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 1.3.1 ALinear Approach to Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . 23 1.3.2 ANonlinear Approach to Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . 27 1.4 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 2 Light and Shading 32 2.1 Modelling Pixel Brightness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 2.1.1 Reflection at Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2.1.2 Sources and Their Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 2.1.3 The Lambertian+Specular Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.1.4 Area Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.2 Inference from Shading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 2.2.1 Radiometric Calibration and High Dynamic Range Images . . 38 2.2.2 The Shape of Specularities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 2.2.3 Inferring Lightness and Illumination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 2.2.4 Photometric Stereo: Shape from Multiple Shaded Images . . 46 2.3 Modelling Interreflection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 2.3.1 The Illumination at a Patch Due to an Area Source . . . . . 52 2.3.2 Radiosity and Exitance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 2.3.3 An Interreflection Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 2.3.4 Qualitative Properties of Interreflections . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 2.4 Shape from One Shaded Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 2.5 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 3 Color 68 3.1 Human Color Perception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3.1.1 Color Matching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3.1.2 Color Receptors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 3.2 The Physics of Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 3.2.1 The Color of Light Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 3.2.2 The Color of Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 3.3 Representing Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 3.3.1 Linear Color Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 3.3.2 Non-linear Color Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 3.4 AModel of Image Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 3.4.1 The Diffuse Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 3.4.2 The Specular Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5 Inference from Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5.1 Finding Specularities Using Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5.2 Shadow Removal Using Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 3.5.3 Color Constancy: Surface Color from Image Color . . . . . . 95 3.6 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 II EARLY VISION: JUST ONE IMAGE 105 4 Linear Filters 107 4.1 Linear Filters and Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 4.1.1 Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 4.2 Shift Invariant Linear Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 4.2.1 Discrete Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 4.2.2 Continuous Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 4.2.3 Edge Effects in Discrete Convolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 4.3 Spatial Frequency and Fourier Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 4.3.1 Fourier Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 4.4 Sampling and Aliasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 4.4.1 Sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 4.4.2 Aliasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 4.4.3 Smoothing and Resampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 4.5 Filters as Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 4.5.1 Convolution as a Dot Product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 4.5.2 Changing Basis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 4.6 Technique: Normalized Correlation and Finding Patterns . . . . . . 132 4.6.1 Controlling the Television by Finding Hands by Normalized Correlation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 4.7 Technique: Scale and Image Pyramids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 4.7.1 The Gaussian Pyramid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 4.7.2 Applications of Scaled Representations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 4.8 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 5 Local Image Features 141 5.1 Computing the Image Gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 5.1.1 Derivative of Gaussian Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 5.2 Representing the Image Gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 5.2.1 Gradient-Based Edge Detectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 5.2.2 Orientations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 5.3 Finding Corners and Building Neighborhoods . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 5.3.1 Finding Corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 5.3.2 Using Scale and Orientation to Build a Neighborhood . . . . 151 5.4 Describing Neighborhoods with SIFT and HOG Features . . . . . . 155 5.4.1 SIFT Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 5.4.2 HOG Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 5.5 Computing Local Features in Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 5.6 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 6 Texture 164 6.1 Local Texture Representations Using Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 6.1.1 Spots and Bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 6.1.2 From Filter Outputs to Texture Representation . . . . . . . . 168 6.1.3 Local Texture Representations in Practice . . . . . . . . . . . 170 6.2 Pooled Texture Representations by Discovering Textons . . . . . . . 171 6.2.1 Vector Quantization and Textons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 6.2.2 K-means Clustering for Vector Quantization . . . . . . . . . . 172 6.3 Synthesizing Textures and Filling Holes in Images . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.3.1 Synthesis by Sampling Local Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.3.2 Filling in Holes in Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 6.4 Image Denoising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 6.4.1 Non-local Means . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 6.4.2 Block Matching 3D (BM3D) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 6.4.3 Learned Sparse Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 6.4.4 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Appropriate for upper-division undergraduate- and graduate-level courses in computer vision found in departments of Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering. This textbook provides the most complete treatment of modern computer vision methods by two of the leading authorities in the field. This accessible presentation gives both a general view of the entire computer vision enterprise and also offers sufficient detail for students to be able to build useful applications. Students will learn techniques that have proven to be useful by first-hand experience and a wide range of mathematical methods.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 02.06.2020
Zum Angebot
Computer Vision: A Modern Approach
50,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Appropriate for upper-division undergraduate- and graduate-level courses in computer vision found in departments of Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering. This textbook provides the most complete treatment of modern computer vision methods by two of the leading authorities in the field. This accessible presentation gives both a general view of the entire computer vision enterprise and also offers sufficient detail for students to be able to build useful applications. Students will learn techniques that have proven to be useful by first-hand experience and a wide range of mathematical methods. Features + Benefits Broad coverage—Coverage of a wide range of topics allows customization to fit instructor, student, and course needs. Allows instructors to select the most relevant topics for their students and encourages students to enrich their coursework by reading information on other computer vision topics. Most comprehensive and up-to-date text on computer vision—Includes essential topics that either reflect practical significance or are of theoretical importance. Provides students with the most coherent synthesis of current views and teaches them successful techniques for building applications. Depth of the material accessible to various levels of students—Topics are discussed in substantial and increasing depth. While the first half of each chapter is accessible to undergraduates, a good grasp of each chapter provides students with a professional level of skill and knowledge. Application surveys—Describe numerous important application areas such as image based rendering and digital libraries. Teaches students about practical use of techniques and helps them gain insight into the demands of applications. Many important algorithms broken down and illustrated in pseudo code. Enables students to build working systems easily as they can understand the construction of the final application. Excellent pedagogy throughout the text—Includes numerous worked examples, exercises, programming assignments, and extensive illustrations. Provides students with ample opportunity to apply the concepts in the text. I IMAGE FORMATION 1 1 Geometric Camera Models 3 1.1 Image Formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.1 Pinhole Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.2 Weak Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.1.3 Cameras with Lenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.1.4 The Human Eye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.2 Intrinsic and Extrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.2.1 Rigid Transformations and Homogeneous Coordinates . . . . 14 1.2.2 Intrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.2.3 Extrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 1.2.4 Perspective Projection Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1.2.5 Weak-Perspective Projection Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 1.3 Geometric Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 1.3.1 ALinear Approach to Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . 23 1.3.2 ANonlinear Approach to Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . 27 1.4 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 2 Light and Shading 32 2.1 Modelling Pixel Brightness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 2.1.1 Reflection at Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2.1.2 Sources and Their Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 2.1.3 The Lambertian+Specular Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.1.4 Area Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.2 Inference from Shading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 2.2.1 Radiometric Calibration and High Dynamic Range Images . . 38 2.2.2 The Shape of Specularities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 2.2.3 Inferring Lightness and Illumination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 2.2.4 Photometric Stereo: Shape from Multiple Shaded Images . . 46 2.3 Modelling Interreflection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 2.3.1 The Illumination at a Patch Due to an Area Source . . . . . 52 2.3.2 Radiosity and Exitance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 2.3.3 An Interreflection Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 2.3.4 Qualitative Properties of Interreflections . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 2.4 Shape from One Shaded Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 2.5 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 3 Color 68 3.1 Human Color Perception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3.1.1 Color Matching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3.1.2 Color Receptors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 3.2 The Physics of Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 3.2.1 The Color of Light Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 3.2.2 The Color of Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 3.3 Representing Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 3.3.1 Linear Color Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 3.3.2 Non-linear Color Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 3.4 AModel of Image Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 3.4.1 The Diffuse Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 3.4.2 The Specular Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5 Inference from Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5.1 Finding Specularities Using Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5.2 Shadow Removal Using Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 3.5.3 Color Constancy: Surface Color from Image Color . . . . . . 95 3.6 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 II EARLY VISION: JUST ONE IMAGE 105 4 Linear Filters 107 4.1 Linear Filters and Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 4.1.1 Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 4.2 Shift Invariant Linear Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 4.2.1 Discrete Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 4.2.2 Continuous Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 4.2.3 Edge Effects in Discrete Convolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 4.3 Spatial Frequency and Fourier Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 4.3.1 Fourier Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 4.4 Sampling and Aliasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 4.4.1 Sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 4.4.2 Aliasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 4.4.3 Smoothing and Resampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 4.5 Filters as Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 4.5.1 Convolution as a Dot Product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 4.5.2 Changing Basis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 4.6 Technique: Normalized Correlation and Finding Patterns . . . . . . 132 4.6.1 Controlling the Television by Finding Hands by Normalized Correlation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 4.7 Technique: Scale and Image Pyramids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 4.7.1 The Gaussian Pyramid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 4.7.2 Applications of Scaled Representations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 4.8 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 5 Local Image Features 141 5.1 Computing the Image Gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 5.1.1 Derivative of Gaussian Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 5.2 Representing the Image Gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 5.2.1 Gradient-Based Edge Detectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 5.2.2 Orientations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 5.3 Finding Corners and Building Neighborhoods . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 5.3.1 Finding Corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 5.3.2 Using Scale and Orientation to Build a Neighborhood . . . . 151 5.4 Describing Neighborhoods with SIFT and HOG Features . . . . . . 155 5.4.1 SIFT Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 5.4.2 HOG Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 5.5 Computing Local Features in Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 5.6 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 6 Texture 164 6.1 Local Texture Representations Using Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 6.1.1 Spots and Bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 6.1.2 From Filter Outputs to Texture Representation . . . . . . . . 168 6.1.3 Local Texture Representations in Practice . . . . . . . . . . . 170 6.2 Pooled Texture Representations by Discovering Textons . . . . . . . 171 6.2.1 Vector Quantization and Textons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 6.2.2 K-means Clustering for Vector Quantization . . . . . . . . . . 172 6.3 Synthesizing Textures and Filling Holes in Images . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.3.1 Synthesis by Sampling Local Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.3.2 Filling in Holes in Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 6.4 Image Denoising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 6.4.1 Non-local Means . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 6.4.2 Block Matching 3D (BM3D) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 6.4.3 Learned Sparse Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 6.4.4 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Appropriate for upper-division undergraduate- and graduate-level courses in computer vision found in departments of Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering. This textbook provides the most complete treatment of modern computer vision methods by two of the leading authorities in the field. This accessible presentation gives both a general view of the entire computer vision enterprise and also offers sufficient detail for students to be able to build useful applications. Students will learn techniques that have proven to be useful by first-hand experience and a wide range of mathematical methods.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 02.06.2020
Zum Angebot
Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography: Selectio...
56,49 € *
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Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography: Selections from the Pinhole Resource Collection: Pinhole Photography: Selections from the Pinhole Resource Coll ab 56.49 EURO

Anbieter: ebook.de
Stand: 02.06.2020
Zum Angebot
Pinhole Glasses
34,00 € *
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pinhole glasses, also known as stenopeic glasses, are eyeglasses with a series of pinhole-sized perforations filling an opaque sheet of plastic in place of each lens. Similar to the workings of a pinhole camera, each perforation allows only a very narrow beam of light to enter the eye which reduces the size of the circle of confusion on the retina and increases depth of field. In eyes with refractive error, the result is often a clearer image. Unlike conventional prescription glasses, pinhole glasses produce a clear image without the pincushion effect around the edges (which makes straight lines appear curved). While pinhole glasses are useful for people who are both near- and far-sighted, they are not recommended for people with over 6 diopters of myopia. It should also be noted that pinhole glasses reduce brightness and peripheral vision, and thus should not be used for driving or when operating machinery.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 02.06.2020
Zum Angebot
Confocal Microscopy for Biologists
130,00 CHF *
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There has been a great upsurge in interest in light microscopy in recent years due to the advent of a number of significant advances in microscopy, one of the most important of which is confocal microscopy. Confocal microscopy has now become an important research tool, with a large number of new fluorescent dyes becoming available in the past few years, for probing your pet structure or molecule within fixed or living cell or tissue sampies. Many of the people interested in using confocal microscopy to further their research do not have a background in microscopy or even cell biology and so not only do they find considerable difficulty in obtaining satisfactory results with a confocal microscope, but they may be mislead by how data is being presented. This book is intended to teach you the basic concepts ofmicroscopy, fluorescence, digital imaging and the principles of confocal microscopy so that you may take full advantage ofthe excellent confocal microscopes now available. This book is also an excellent reference source for information related to confocal microscopy for both beginners and the more advanced users. For example, do you need to know the optimal pinhole size for a 63x 1. 4 NA lens? Do you need to know the fluorescence emission spectrum of Alexa 568? Access to the wealth of practical information in this book is made easier by using both the detailed index and the extensive glossary.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 02.06.2020
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The Physics and Art of Photography, Volume 1
216,90 CHF *
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This book uses art photography as a point of departure for learning about physics, while also using physics as a point of departure for asking fundamental questions about the nature of photography as an art. Although not a how-to manual, the topics center around hands-on applications, most-often illustrated by photographic processes that are inexpensive and easily accessible to students (including a versatile new process developed by the author, and herein first described in print). A central theme is the connection between the physical interaction of light and matter on the one hand, and the artistry of the photographic processes and their results on the other. Geometry and the Nature of Light focuses on the physics of light and the optics of lenses, but also includes extended discussions of topics less commonly covered in a beginning text, including symmetry in art and physics, different physical processes of the scattering of light, photograms (photographic shadow prints) and the nature of shadows, elements of 2-dimensional design, pinhole photography and the view camera. Although written at a beginning undergraduate level, the topics are chosen for their role in a more general discussion of the relation between science and art that is of interest to readers of all backgrounds and levels of expertise.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 02.06.2020
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Pogue's Basics: Life
16,90 CHF *
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New York Times Bestseller Do you know the pinhole-finger trick for seeing without glasses? Did you realize that booking a hotel room with your phone is cheaper than doing it on your PC? Do you know how to get the last dregs of ketchup out of the bottle-in one second? In David Pogue's New York Times bestselling book Pogue's Basics: Tech, the author shared his essential tips and tricks for making all your gadgets seem easier, faster, and less of a hassle to use. In this new book, he widens his focus-to life itself. In these pages, you'll find more than 150 tricks, shortcuts, and cheats for everyday life: house and home, cars, clothing, travel, food, health, and more. This timeless reference book will shed light on priceless bits of advice and life hacks that already exist in the world around you-you just never knew! Tips include: Insider cheats for cheap air fare, how to read signs in other languages, the three-cent trick for staying awake behind the wheel, how to know which side of the highway your exit will be on, how to quench a spicy mouth on fire, and much much more!

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 02.06.2020
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Confocal Microscopy for Biologists
127,99 € *
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There has been a great upsurge in interest in light microscopy in recent years due to the advent of a number of significant advances in microscopy, one of the most important of which is confocal microscopy. Confocal microscopy has now become an important research tool, with a large number of new fluorescent dyes becoming available in the past few years, for probing your pet structure or molecule within fixed or living cell or tissue sampies. Many of the people interested in using confocal microscopy to further their research do not have a background in microscopy or even cell biology and so not only do they find considerable difficulty in obtaining satisfactory results with a confocal microscope, but they may be mislead by how data is being presented. This book is intended to teach you the basic concepts ofmicroscopy, fluorescence, digital imaging and the principles of confocal microscopy so that you may take full advantage ofthe excellent confocal microscopes now available. This book is also an excellent reference source for information related to confocal microscopy for both beginners and the more advanced users. For example, do you need to know the optimal pinhole size for a 63x 1. 4 NA lens? Do you need to know the fluorescence emission spectrum of Alexa 568? Access to the wealth of practical information in this book is made easier by using both the detailed index and the extensive glossary.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 02.06.2020
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