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Under Armour Damen Threadborne Mesh Kurzarmshir...
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Women's Threadborne Mesh SS TeePerfect for gym and workout sessions, the Women's Threadborne Mesh SS Tee is brilliant in warmer conditions. UA Heatgear fabric is highly advanced and will keep you cool throughout.Features:Material: 100% PolyesterFitted: Next-to-skin without the squeezeLight but locked in pinhole mesh delivers superior breathability without sacrificing coverageSignature moisture transport system wicks sweat to keep you dry and lightLightweight, 4-way stretch construction improves mobility and maintains shapeAnti-microbial technology keeps gear fresher for longerRolled-forward flatlock seams deliver a comfortable, chafe-free fitShaped drop-tail hem offers superior back coverageClassic crew neckBuy Under Armour Clothing from Chain Reaction Cycles, the World's Largest Online Bike Store.

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Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography: Selectio...
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Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography: Selections from the Pinhole Resource Collection: Pinhole Photography: Selections from the Pinhole Resource Coll ab 53.49 € als gebundene Ausgabe: . Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Kunst & Musik,

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Pinhole Photography
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Pinhole Photography ab 49.49 € als epub eBook: From Historic Technique to Digital Application. 4. Auflage. Aus dem Bereich: eBooks, Belletristik, Erzählungen,

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Stand: 01.04.2020
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Way Beyond Monochrome
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Photo Techniques Magazine stated: "All our readers need to know about this very useful book." Indeed, there is no other compendium that is as in-depth as this for the beauty and magic of fine-art black-and-white photography. With 560 pages and over 1,000 illustrations, Way Beyond Monochrome starts with conceptual lessons of composition and takes you through image capture, exposure, controlling tonality, variable-contrast paper, archival printing, mounting, framing and presentation with simple concepts to an advanced level. This new edition has been completely revised and heavily expanded, adding over 250 pages to the original edition with new chapters on print mounting, spotting, framing, digital negatives, utilizing digital technologies for alternative processes, and fabulous do-it-yourself projects. Overall, the authors have created a thoroughly researched, technologically sound yet aesthetically pleasing, inspirational bible for monochrome photography. New to this edition: almost double the content a new section discussing the path from visualization to print, illustrating the interaction between eye and brain, explaining the rules of composition and when to break them to produce photographs with impact a new section on presentation including hands-on mounting, matting, spotting, and framing image capture has a more in-depth focus, now covering pinhole photography and digital capture now includes making and printing with digital negatives a new section discussing the pros and cons of typical image-taking and image-making equipment plus new do-it-yourself projects, including many darkroom tools and an electronic shutter tester a useful collection of templates, to copy, cut-out and take with you in your camera bag or use in the darkroom an appendix with all the recipes to make your own darkroom chemicals from scratch all illustrations improved and updated improved index with 1,400 references

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Stand: 01.04.2020
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Way Beyond Monochrome
54,99 € *
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Photo Techniques Magazine stated: "All our readers need to know about this very useful book." Indeed, there is no other compendium that is as in-depth as this for the beauty and magic of fine-art black-and-white photography. With 560 pages and over 1,000 illustrations, Way Beyond Monochrome starts with conceptual lessons of composition and takes you through image capture, exposure, controlling tonality, variable-contrast paper, archival printing, mounting, framing and presentation with simple concepts to an advanced level. This new edition has been completely revised and heavily expanded, adding over 250 pages to the original edition with new chapters on print mounting, spotting, framing, digital negatives, utilizing digital technologies for alternative processes, and fabulous do-it-yourself projects. Overall, the authors have created a thoroughly researched, technologically sound yet aesthetically pleasing, inspirational bible for monochrome photography. New to this edition: almost double the content a new section discussing the path from visualization to print, illustrating the interaction between eye and brain, explaining the rules of composition and when to break them to produce photographs with impact a new section on presentation including hands-on mounting, matting, spotting, and framing image capture has a more in-depth focus, now covering pinhole photography and digital capture now includes making and printing with digital negatives a new section discussing the pros and cons of typical image-taking and image-making equipment plus new do-it-yourself projects, including many darkroom tools and an electronic shutter tester a useful collection of templates, to copy, cut-out and take with you in your camera bag or use in the darkroom an appendix with all the recipes to make your own darkroom chemicals from scratch all illustrations improved and updated improved index with 1,400 references

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 01.04.2020
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Carnage: Arisen, Book 12 , Hörbuch, Digital, 1,...
9,95 € *
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Carnage is now a number-one best seller in Dystopian Science Fiction, number one in War and Military Action Fiction, and an Amazon overall Top 100 best seller. Alpha team looks the devil in the eye. After recovering Patient Zero, Alpha must escape Africa to end the ZA once and for all. But they can feel the hot breath of a reinforced and vengeful Spetsnaz team on their necks - and there can be no escaping the reckoning of an ultimate sniper showdown between Ali and Vasily, and an incomparably brutal iron-cage Texas death match between Predator and Misha. For the first time, all the teams will come together and must fight as brothers for any chance of making it back to Britain. And only one thing is certain - not everyone is walking away from this one. One Troop rallies against decimation and defeat. After rescuing Aliyev, One Troop is pinned down in Red Square between a surging singularity and the merciless killers of Spetsnaz Alfa Group. They're about to lose their second aircraft, they still don't have the zombie-killing MZ, and the clock is ticking down on their pinhole of escape. Only the most vicious and desperate gambit can give them a chance of saving London, not to mention themselves - but Jameson refuses to fail. The crew of the Kennedy battles back. With the bridge and most critical stations held by the world's deadliest maritime commando force and Dr. Park pinned down by a smash-mouth battle and last stand in the ship's hospital, time is running out for the shell-shocked and outgunned crew of the JFK to fight back. The ultimate heroism and sacrifice of everyone from storekeepers all the way up to Commander Drake himself will be required to fight their way back from the brink.... Defiance. Valor. Consecration. Carnage. 1. Language: English. Narrator: R. C. Bray. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/podm/000410/bk_podm_000410_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
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Computer Vision: A Modern Approach
50,99 € *
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Appropriate for upper-division undergraduate- and graduate-level courses in computer vision found in departments of Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering. This textbook provides the most complete treatment of modern computer vision methods by two of the leading authorities in the field. This accessible presentation gives both a general view of the entire computer vision enterprise and also offers sufficient detail for students to be able to build useful applications. Students will learn techniques that have proven to be useful by first-hand experience and a wide range of mathematical methods. Features + Benefits Broad coverage—Coverage of a wide range of topics allows customization to fit instructor, student, and course needs. Allows instructors to select the most relevant topics for their students and encourages students to enrich their coursework by reading information on other computer vision topics. Most comprehensive and up-to-date text on computer vision—Includes essential topics that either reflect practical significance or are of theoretical importance. Provides students with the most coherent synthesis of current views and teaches them successful techniques for building applications. Depth of the material accessible to various levels of students—Topics are discussed in substantial and increasing depth. While the first half of each chapter is accessible to undergraduates, a good grasp of each chapter provides students with a professional level of skill and knowledge. Application surveys—Describe numerous important application areas such as image based rendering and digital libraries. Teaches students about practical use of techniques and helps them gain insight into the demands of applications. Many important algorithms broken down and illustrated in pseudo code. Enables students to build working systems easily as they can understand the construction of the final application. Excellent pedagogy throughout the text—Includes numerous worked examples, exercises, programming assignments, and extensive illustrations. Provides students with ample opportunity to apply the concepts in the text. I IMAGE FORMATION 1 1 Geometric Camera Models 3 1.1 Image Formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.1 Pinhole Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.2 Weak Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.1.3 Cameras with Lenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.1.4 The Human Eye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.2 Intrinsic and Extrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.2.1 Rigid Transformations and Homogeneous Coordinates . . . . 14 1.2.2 Intrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.2.3 Extrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 1.2.4 Perspective Projection Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1.2.5 Weak-Perspective Projection Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 1.3 Geometric Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 1.3.1 ALinear Approach to Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . 23 1.3.2 ANonlinear Approach to Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . 27 1.4 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 2 Light and Shading 32 2.1 Modelling Pixel Brightness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 2.1.1 Reflection at Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2.1.2 Sources and Their Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 2.1.3 The Lambertian+Specular Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.1.4 Area Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.2 Inference from Shading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 2.2.1 Radiometric Calibration and High Dynamic Range Images . . 38 2.2.2 The Shape of Specularities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 2.2.3 Inferring Lightness and Illumination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 2.2.4 Photometric Stereo: Shape from Multiple Shaded Images . . 46 2.3 Modelling Interreflection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 2.3.1 The Illumination at a Patch Due to an Area Source . . . . . 52 2.3.2 Radiosity and Exitance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 2.3.3 An Interreflection Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 2.3.4 Qualitative Properties of Interreflections . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 2.4 Shape from One Shaded Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 2.5 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 3 Color 68 3.1 Human Color Perception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3.1.1 Color Matching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3.1.2 Color Receptors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 3.2 The Physics of Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 3.2.1 The Color of Light Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 3.2.2 The Color of Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 3.3 Representing Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 3.3.1 Linear Color Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 3.3.2 Non-linear Color Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 3.4 AModel of Image Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 3.4.1 The Diffuse Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 3.4.2 The Specular Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5 Inference from Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5.1 Finding Specularities Using Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5.2 Shadow Removal Using Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 3.5.3 Color Constancy: Surface Color from Image Color . . . . . . 95 3.6 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 II EARLY VISION: JUST ONE IMAGE 105 4 Linear Filters 107 4.1 Linear Filters and Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 4.1.1 Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 4.2 Shift Invariant Linear Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 4.2.1 Discrete Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 4.2.2 Continuous Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 4.2.3 Edge Effects in Discrete Convolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 4.3 Spatial Frequency and Fourier Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 4.3.1 Fourier Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 4.4 Sampling and Aliasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 4.4.1 Sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 4.4.2 Aliasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 4.4.3 Smoothing and Resampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 4.5 Filters as Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 4.5.1 Convolution as a Dot Product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 4.5.2 Changing Basis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 4.6 Technique: Normalized Correlation and Finding Patterns . . . . . . 132 4.6.1 Controlling the Television by Finding Hands by Normalized Correlation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 4.7 Technique: Scale and Image Pyramids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 4.7.1 The Gaussian Pyramid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 4.7.2 Applications of Scaled Representations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 4.8 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 5 Local Image Features 141 5.1 Computing the Image Gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 5.1.1 Derivative of Gaussian Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 5.2 Representing the Image Gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 5.2.1 Gradient-Based Edge Detectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 5.2.2 Orientations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 5.3 Finding Corners and Building Neighborhoods . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 5.3.1 Finding Corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 5.3.2 Using Scale and Orientation to Build a Neighborhood . . . . 151 5.4 Describing Neighborhoods with SIFT and HOG Features . . . . . . 155 5.4.1 SIFT Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 5.4.2 HOG Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 5.5 Computing Local Features in Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 5.6 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 6 Texture 164 6.1 Local Texture Representations Using Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 6.1.1 Spots and Bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 6.1.2 From Filter Outputs to Texture Representation . . . . . . . . 168 6.1.3 Local Texture Representations in Practice . . . . . . . . . . . 170 6.2 Pooled Texture Representations by Discovering Textons . . . . . . . 171 6.2.1 Vector Quantization and Textons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 6.2.2 K-means Clustering for Vector Quantization . . . . . . . . . . 172 6.3 Synthesizing Textures and Filling Holes in Images . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.3.1 Synthesis by Sampling Local Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.3.2 Filling in Holes in Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 6.4 Image Denoising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 6.4.1 Non-local Means . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 6.4.2 Block Matching 3D (BM3D) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 6.4.3 Learned Sparse Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 6.4.4 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Appropriate for upper-division undergraduate- and graduate-level courses in computer vision found in departments of Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering. This textbook provides the most complete treatment of modern computer vision methods by two of the leading authorities in the field. This accessible presentation gives both a general view of the entire computer vision enterprise and also offers sufficient detail for students to be able to build useful applications. Students will learn techniques that have proven to be useful by first-hand experience and a wide range of mathematical methods.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 01.04.2020
Zum Angebot
Computer Vision: A Modern Approach
50,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Appropriate for upper-division undergraduate- and graduate-level courses in computer vision found in departments of Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering. This textbook provides the most complete treatment of modern computer vision methods by two of the leading authorities in the field. This accessible presentation gives both a general view of the entire computer vision enterprise and also offers sufficient detail for students to be able to build useful applications. Students will learn techniques that have proven to be useful by first-hand experience and a wide range of mathematical methods. Features + Benefits Broad coverage—Coverage of a wide range of topics allows customization to fit instructor, student, and course needs. Allows instructors to select the most relevant topics for their students and encourages students to enrich their coursework by reading information on other computer vision topics. Most comprehensive and up-to-date text on computer vision—Includes essential topics that either reflect practical significance or are of theoretical importance. Provides students with the most coherent synthesis of current views and teaches them successful techniques for building applications. Depth of the material accessible to various levels of students—Topics are discussed in substantial and increasing depth. While the first half of each chapter is accessible to undergraduates, a good grasp of each chapter provides students with a professional level of skill and knowledge. Application surveys—Describe numerous important application areas such as image based rendering and digital libraries. Teaches students about practical use of techniques and helps them gain insight into the demands of applications. Many important algorithms broken down and illustrated in pseudo code. Enables students to build working systems easily as they can understand the construction of the final application. Excellent pedagogy throughout the text—Includes numerous worked examples, exercises, programming assignments, and extensive illustrations. Provides students with ample opportunity to apply the concepts in the text. I IMAGE FORMATION 1 1 Geometric Camera Models 3 1.1 Image Formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.1 Pinhole Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.2 Weak Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.1.3 Cameras with Lenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.1.4 The Human Eye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.2 Intrinsic and Extrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.2.1 Rigid Transformations and Homogeneous Coordinates . . . . 14 1.2.2 Intrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.2.3 Extrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 1.2.4 Perspective Projection Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1.2.5 Weak-Perspective Projection Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 1.3 Geometric Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 1.3.1 ALinear Approach to Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . 23 1.3.2 ANonlinear Approach to Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . 27 1.4 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 2 Light and Shading 32 2.1 Modelling Pixel Brightness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 2.1.1 Reflection at Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2.1.2 Sources and Their Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 2.1.3 The Lambertian+Specular Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.1.4 Area Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.2 Inference from Shading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 2.2.1 Radiometric Calibration and High Dynamic Range Images . . 38 2.2.2 The Shape of Specularities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 2.2.3 Inferring Lightness and Illumination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 2.2.4 Photometric Stereo: Shape from Multiple Shaded Images . . 46 2.3 Modelling Interreflection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 2.3.1 The Illumination at a Patch Due to an Area Source . . . . . 52 2.3.2 Radiosity and Exitance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 2.3.3 An Interreflection Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 2.3.4 Qualitative Properties of Interreflections . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 2.4 Shape from One Shaded Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 2.5 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 3 Color 68 3.1 Human Color Perception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3.1.1 Color Matching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3.1.2 Color Receptors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 3.2 The Physics of Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 3.2.1 The Color of Light Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 3.2.2 The Color of Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 3.3 Representing Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 3.3.1 Linear Color Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 3.3.2 Non-linear Color Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 3.4 AModel of Image Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 3.4.1 The Diffuse Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 3.4.2 The Specular Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5 Inference from Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5.1 Finding Specularities Using Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5.2 Shadow Removal Using Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 3.5.3 Color Constancy: Surface Color from Image Color . . . . . . 95 3.6 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 II EARLY VISION: JUST ONE IMAGE 105 4 Linear Filters 107 4.1 Linear Filters and Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 4.1.1 Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 4.2 Shift Invariant Linear Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 4.2.1 Discrete Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 4.2.2 Continuous Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 4.2.3 Edge Effects in Discrete Convolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 4.3 Spatial Frequency and Fourier Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 4.3.1 Fourier Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 4.4 Sampling and Aliasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 4.4.1 Sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 4.4.2 Aliasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 4.4.3 Smoothing and Resampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 4.5 Filters as Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 4.5.1 Convolution as a Dot Product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 4.5.2 Changing Basis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 4.6 Technique: Normalized Correlation and Finding Patterns . . . . . . 132 4.6.1 Controlling the Television by Finding Hands by Normalized Correlation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 4.7 Technique: Scale and Image Pyramids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 4.7.1 The Gaussian Pyramid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 4.7.2 Applications of Scaled Representations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 4.8 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 5 Local Image Features 141 5.1 Computing the Image Gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 5.1.1 Derivative of Gaussian Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 5.2 Representing the Image Gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 5.2.1 Gradient-Based Edge Detectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 5.2.2 Orientations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 5.3 Finding Corners and Building Neighborhoods . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 5.3.1 Finding Corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 5.3.2 Using Scale and Orientation to Build a Neighborhood . . . . 151 5.4 Describing Neighborhoods with SIFT and HOG Features . . . . . . 155 5.4.1 SIFT Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 5.4.2 HOG Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 5.5 Computing Local Features in Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 5.6 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 6 Texture 164 6.1 Local Texture Representations Using Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 6.1.1 Spots and Bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 6.1.2 From Filter Outputs to Texture Representation . . . . . . . . 168 6.1.3 Local Texture Representations in Practice . . . . . . . . . . . 170 6.2 Pooled Texture Representations by Discovering Textons . . . . . . . 171 6.2.1 Vector Quantization and Textons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 6.2.2 K-means Clustering for Vector Quantization . . . . . . . . . . 172 6.3 Synthesizing Textures and Filling Holes in Images . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.3.1 Synthesis by Sampling Local Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.3.2 Filling in Holes in Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 6.4 Image Denoising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 6.4.1 Non-local Means . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 6.4.2 Block Matching 3D (BM3D) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 6.4.3 Learned Sparse Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 6.4.4 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Appropriate for upper-division undergraduate- and graduate-level courses in computer vision found in departments of Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering. This textbook provides the most complete treatment of modern computer vision methods by two of the leading authorities in the field. This accessible presentation gives both a general view of the entire computer vision enterprise and also offers sufficient detail for students to be able to build useful applications. Students will learn techniques that have proven to be useful by first-hand experience and a wide range of mathematical methods.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 01.04.2020
Zum Angebot
Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography: Selectio...
53,99 € *
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Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography: Selections from the Pinhole Resource Collection: Pinhole Photography: Selections from the Pinhole Resource Coll ab 53.99 EURO

Anbieter: ebook.de
Stand: 01.04.2020
Zum Angebot